Welcome to Strength & Honor
 
HomeCalendarGalleryFAQSearchMemberlistUsergroupsRegisterLog in
{S&H} SERVER DONATIONS
Photobucket
Code of Conduct
Photobucket
Latest topics
» Hey Y'all, Its Phingies
Wed Feb 22, 2017 11:10 pm by STEELHED

» World of War Ships member footage
Fri Jan 27, 2017 8:43 am by Shootist75

» A little history into the BF series..
Wed Nov 30, 2016 7:30 pm by The MAD Doctor

» My BF1 beta impressions...
Wed Oct 26, 2016 8:29 am by STEELHED

» Good Price
Wed Oct 12, 2016 3:52 pm by STEELHED

» Long Time No See
Fri Oct 07, 2016 9:27 am by Travis32

» Battlefield One open beta available to everyone Aug 31st
Tue Aug 30, 2016 4:59 am by STEELHED

» Battlefield One Beta Discussion..
Wed Aug 24, 2016 8:47 pm by lurkin727

» Anyone still alive?
Wed Aug 24, 2016 8:21 pm by lurkin727

Ban Appeals
Photobucket
Geo-Locator
BF4 Stats
Photobucket
BF3 Stats
Photobucket
TS3 66.150.214.9:8640

Share | 
 

 Butterfly of the Day!

View previous topic View next topic Go down 
AuthorMessage
Butterfly

avatar

Posts : 490
Join date : 2010-01-22
Age : 25
Location : Canada

PostSubject: Butterfly of the Day!   Wed Mar 17, 2010 8:11 pm



Lycaenidae (gossamer-wings): The gossamer-wing butterflies are characteristically small butterflies. All the subfamilies have similar looking species making for difficult field identification. Except for their sharing a blue color, the blue butterflies are among the most difficult to identify. Other member of the Lycaenidae family are the coppers, hairstreaks and elfins
Back to top Go down
View user profile
Butterfly

avatar

Posts : 490
Join date : 2010-01-22
Age : 25
Location : Canada

PostSubject: Re: Butterfly of the Day!   Thu Mar 18, 2010 1:49 pm

.


This is a very common species across the United States. Most accounts of the Spring Azure start with the fact that it is one of the first spring butterflies.There is a superficial chevron mark on each wing that sits below a pattern of small dark spots
Back to top Go down
View user profile
STEELHED
Admin
avatar

Posts : 1545
Join date : 2010-01-15
Age : 51
Location : Washington

PostSubject: Re: Butterfly of the Day!   Thu Mar 18, 2010 2:15 pm

Colorful they are...

_________________

Back to top Go down
View user profile
set_flo



Posts : 50
Join date : 2010-03-17
Age : 28
Location : Berlin

PostSubject: Re: Butterfly of the Day!   Thu Mar 18, 2010 3:04 pm

yeh
I think I have similar ones at my home in a glass case with needles stuck through them.
Very colourful Razz
Back to top Go down
View user profile
Butterfly

avatar

Posts : 490
Join date : 2010-01-22
Age : 25
Location : Canada

PostSubject: Re: Butterfly of the Day!   Fri Mar 19, 2010 6:24 pm




The Western Tailed-blue (Cupido amyntula) is a failry common resident of the Western States. The Eastern Tailed-Blue (Cupido comyntas) is one of the most widespread blue butterflies in the United States. Abundant throughout the East, a small population also lives in California, Oregon and Washington State.

Identifying a Tailed-blue butterfly is fairly easy. Both species share the characteristic of small tails (hair-like protrusions) on the bottom of their wings, a physical trail they share with the hairstreaks.

Because both species look very similar, differentiating between the Eastern and Western species in the West is problematic at best.
Back to top Go down
View user profile
Butterfly

avatar

Posts : 490
Join date : 2010-01-22
Age : 25
Location : Canada

PostSubject: Re: Butterfly of the Day!   Sat Mar 20, 2010 5:31 pm




The Reakirt's Blue Butterfly is a very common butterfly, inhabiting grasslands, riparian areas and desert regions of the Midwest, south through Texas, and the lower Rocky Mountain states. Like other blue butterflies, you can often see them puddling along wet terrain on sunny days.
Back to top Go down
View user profile
Butterfly

avatar

Posts : 490
Join date : 2010-01-22
Age : 25
Location : Canada

PostSubject: Re: Butterfly of the Day!   Mon Mar 22, 2010 6:50 pm



Physical similarities among species of the Euphilotes genus of blue butterflies means identification problems abound.

Generally the genus divides along Square-Spotted Blue and Dotted Blue groups, often called complexes, because even within groups, slight physical differences are discernible in different geographical regions.

Generally the square-spotted blues are identified by the presence of a connected band of orange on the underside of the hind wing, while the orange band on the dotted blues is disconnected.
Back to top Go down
View user profile
CactusJab

avatar

Posts : 41
Join date : 2010-01-19
Age : 34
Location : Chachoengsao, แปดริ้ว, Thailand

PostSubject: Re: Butterfly of the Day!   Tue Mar 23, 2010 2:33 am

they look like a day dwelling moth species
awesome,
daywalkers
flyers
Back to top Go down
View user profile
Butterfly

avatar

Posts : 490
Join date : 2010-01-22
Age : 25
Location : Canada

PostSubject: Re: Butterfly of the Day!   Tue Mar 23, 2010 5:43 pm



The distinct gray and whitepattern with balck spots on the underside of the wings on the Arrowhead Blue makes it practically impossible to misidentify the species, providing you can find one.

Their range extends throughout higher elevation areas of the Western United States.
Back to top Go down
View user profile
Butterfly

avatar

Posts : 490
Join date : 2010-01-22
Age : 25
Location : Canada

PostSubject: Re: Butterfly of the Day!   Fri Mar 26, 2010 8:19 pm




Silvery blues (Glaucopsyche lygdamus) are small, iridescent blue butterflies found in North America and Canada. Their wingspan is only 7/8-inch to 1-1/4-inch wide and they are found in a wide range of habitats, from coastal dunes to prairies. While the species as a whole is plentiful, one subspecies (palosverdesensis) is critically endangered, with a rank of T1 by the Nature Conservancy (critically imperiled globally because of extreme rarity), and another (xerces) is thought to be extinct.
Back to top Go down
View user profile
{S&H} Niquita

avatar

Posts : 34
Join date : 2010-03-22
Age : 25
Location : Dorset, England

PostSubject: Just how many pecies are there?   Fri Mar 26, 2010 9:43 pm

Surely you must be running out of blue ones.
Back to top Go down
View user profile
Butterfly

avatar

Posts : 490
Join date : 2010-01-22
Age : 25
Location : Canada

PostSubject: Re: Butterfly of the Day!   Sat Mar 27, 2010 11:00 am

Not quite, this is about half of them that I've found.

The Ceraunus Blue (Hemiargus ceraunus) is the sole representative of the Hemiargus genus in the United States.

It's a fairly common southern species, found wherever, legumes, the larval host plant, grow. Its small size makes it easy to miss in the field.

The top of the wings are a solid blue color with a slight dark spot on the botttom of the hindwings.

Back to top Go down
View user profile
Butterfly

avatar

Posts : 490
Join date : 2010-01-22
Age : 25
Location : Canada

PostSubject: Re: Butterfly of the Day!   Sun Mar 28, 2010 6:34 pm




Once thought extinct, the Fender's Blue butterfly was rediscovered in 1989, and in January 2000, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service listed it as endangered, under the United States Endangered Species Act.

It is a prairie (grassland) resident, with populations in both upland and wet prairies of the Willamette Valley, OR.

Traditionally, these grasslands hosted a variety of native plants and wildlife, including the primary host plant for Fender's blue larvae, the Kincaid's lupine (also listed as endangered), and the adult food source, native nectar producing flowers.
Back to top Go down
View user profile
Butterfly

avatar

Posts : 490
Join date : 2010-01-22
Age : 25
Location : Canada

PostSubject: Re: Butterfly of the Day!   Mon Mar 29, 2010 5:48 pm

The Cassius Blue (Leptotes cassius) is one of two Leptotes species found in the United States.

They are smaller than average blues with two brightly colored eye spots on the edge of the hind wing.

Their flight pattern is quick and erratic, which provides a good in flight field identification clue.

The Larvae feed on a variety of plants including members of the pea and leadwort families. Adults nectar on a variety of flowers.

Back to top Go down
View user profile
Butterfly

avatar

Posts : 490
Join date : 2010-01-22
Age : 25
Location : Canada

PostSubject: Re: Butterfly of the Day!   Tue Mar 30, 2010 3:35 pm

The Acmon Blue (Plebejus acmon), a small, West Coast butterfly, looks similar to the Lupine Blue.

Its range is more limited than the Lupine Blue, extending only along the West Cost, west of the Cascades and Sierra Nevada.

In areas where the two species share overlapping territory, field identification can be difficult.

The iridescent marks encircling the black spots on top of the orange marks represent the best field identification marks.

With their wings folded, Acmon Blue butterflies are about the size of a dime, so getting a close-up view is the only way to properly identify one. (This is one tiny butterfly!)

Back to top Go down
View user profile
CactusJab

avatar

Posts : 41
Join date : 2010-01-19
Age : 34
Location : Chachoengsao, แปดริ้ว, Thailand

PostSubject: Re: Butterfly of the Day!   Mon Apr 12, 2010 3:27 am

Quote :
In areas where the two species share overlapping territory, field identification can be difficult.
is that because of the butterfly (day moth) inter breeding?
do butterflys cross species breed?
Back to top Go down
View user profile
Butterfly

avatar

Posts : 490
Join date : 2010-01-22
Age : 25
Location : Canada

PostSubject: Re: Butterfly of the Day!   Tue Apr 13, 2010 5:46 pm

You know what, I actually don't know. It's possible I suppose. It is the pattern that throws them off which doesn't help when their territories overlap.
Back to top Go down
View user profile
{S&H} Niquita

avatar

Posts : 34
Join date : 2010-03-22
Age : 25
Location : Dorset, England

PostSubject: We need more butterflies!   Sat Apr 17, 2010 6:55 am

The Old World Swallowtail (Papilio machaon), is a butterfly of the family Papilionidae. The butterfly is also known as the Common Yellow Swallowtail or, simply, The Swallowtail (a common name applied to all members of the family). It is the type species of the genus Papilio and occurs throughout the Palearctic region in Europe and Asia; it also occurs across North America, and thus, is not restricted to the Old World, despite the common name.

Back to top Go down
View user profile
Sponsored content




PostSubject: Re: Butterfly of the Day!   

Back to top Go down
 
Butterfly of the Day!
View previous topic View next topic Back to top 
Page 1 of 1
 Similar topics
-
» Butterfly
» Fatal Frame 2: Deep Crimson Butterfly
» A Blue Butterfly [Tomoe Wild Card Awakening]
» Post You Favorite Halloween Smilies/Gremlins
» NOGHOST PICKUP- up again

Permissions in this forum:You cannot reply to topics in this forum
 :: General Discussion :: General Discussion-
Jump to: